Cardiac Catherization, performed in both Huntley and Elgin hospitals

Introduction

Cardiac catheterization is a minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedure used to evaluate and treat heart conditions. It involves inserting a small, thin tube called a catheter into a large vein in the leg or arm and threading it through the veins to the heart. Cardiac catheterization allows the doctor to measure the pressure and blood flow in the heart, as well as obtain pictures of the heart’s chambers and valves. The procedure can be used to diagnose heart conditions such as coronary artery disease, heart valve disease, and abnormal heart rhythms. It can also be used to treat certain heart conditions, such as congenital heart defects and arrhythmias.

What is cardiac catheterization?

Cardiac catheterization (also called cardiac cath or heart cath) is a procedure to examine how well your heart is working and to identify problems with the arteries that supply blood to your heart muscle. The procedure is performed both in Huntley and Elgin hospitals.

A long, thin tube called a catheter is inserted into a large artery in your leg and threaded through your body to your heart. Once the catheter is in place, pictures are taken of your heart and the arteries that supply it. The pictures are called coronary angiograms.

Your doctor can also use cardiac catheterization to treat some heart conditions. For example, a balloon can be threaded through the catheter to open a blocked artery. A small wire mesh tube (stent) may also be placed in the artery to help keep it open. Cardiac cath is often done in combination with another procedure called angioplasty.

Why is cardiac catheterization performed?

Cardiac catheterization is performed to diagnose and treat heart conditions. Cardiac catheterization can be used to:

-Determine how well your heart is pumping
-Determine the cause of an irregular heartbeat
-Determine if you have coronary artery disease
-Find out how much damage has been done to your heart muscle after a heart attack
-Find out if you have valve disease
-Treat some types of heart rhythm abnormalities
-Treat congestive heart failure

Procedure

Cardiac catheterization is a diagnostic and therapeutic procedure used to evaluate and treat heart conditions. It involves inserting a long, thin tube called a catheter into a vein or artery and threading it through the blood vessels to the heart. The procedure is used to diagnose and treat heart conditions, such as coronary artery disease, heart valve problems, and arrhythmias.

How is cardiac catheterization performed?

Cardiac catheterization is a minimally invasive procedure used to diagnose and treat certain heart conditions.

During the procedure, a long, thin tube called a catheter is inserted into a large blood vessel in the leg and threaded through the body to the heart. Once in place, the catheter can be used to measure the pressure in the heart chambers, take samples of blood for testing, or inject dye into the heart so that it can be seen more clearly on X-ray.

In some cases, cardiac catheterization can also be used to treat heart conditions. For example, if a blockage is found in one of the coronary arteries, a stent (a small metal mesh tube) can be inserted through the catheter to prop open the artery and improve blood flow to the heart.

Cardiac catheterization is usually performed while the patient is under local anesthesia (numbed with medication) and sedated (made sleepy). The procedure typically takes less than an hour and most people can go home the same day.

What are the risks of cardiac catheterization?

Like any procedure, cardiac catheterization has some risks. These include:

-Allergic reaction to the dye or contrast material
-Arrhythmia (irregular heartbeat)
-Bleeding
-Blood clot
-Heart attack
-Infection
-Kidney damage from the dye or contrast material

Recovery

Catheterization is a minimally-invasive cardiac procedure used to diagnose and treat conditions of the heart. A small, hollow tube called a catheter is inserted into a large vein in the leg and passed through the chest to the heart. Once in the heart, the catheter can be used to measure pressures, inject dye for X-rays, or to treat abnormalities. The recovery process after cardiac catheterization is important, as it can help reduce the risk of complications and ensure a successful result.

What is the recovery time for cardiac catheterization?

The typical recover time after a cardiac catheterization is 24 hours. Most people feel well enough to leave the hospital the day after the procedure. During your stay in the hospital, you will be monitored closely by nurses and doctors. You will also be given information on how to care for yourself at home during your recovery.

What are the complications of cardiac catheterization?

Cardiac catheterization is a very safe procedure. However, as with any medical procedure, there are potential risks that you should be aware of.

The most common complications from cardiac catheterization are bleeding and infection. There is also a small risk of damage to the arteries, heart or lungs. In very rare cases, cardiac arrest or death may occur.

If you have any concerns about the risks of cardiac catheterization, be sure to discuss them with your doctor prior to the procedure.

Book your appointment today!

We usually have same day appointments available – call our friendly staff during office hours or book an appointment for the following day.

Call 847-637-5333
Book An Appointment